burleskateer:

Ronnie Bell

(via decadentlullaby)

@theellenshow: Your eyes are like Mediterranean lagoons. (or Ellen fangirling over Jared Leto)

(Source: hiddleto, via thronesofleto)

23.Sep.14 1 hour ago

pugbugduckmug:

sleepy transparent pug

(via thewakeofdevastation)

The World’s Most Wonderful Bookstores!

thepersonificationofperfection:

Poplar Kid’s Republic

Beijing

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Livraria Lello

Porto, Portugal

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Shakespeare & Co. Antiquarian Books

Paris

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El Péndulo

Mexico City

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Selexyz Bookstore

Maastricht, Holland

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Cook and Book

Brussels, Belgium

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El Ateneo Grand Splendid

Buenos Aires, Argentina

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Ler Devagar

Lisbon, Portugal

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(Source: lauralee-evans, via roma-mars-amor)

23.Sep.14 5 hours ago

(Source: octoberblood, via iamrickyhoover)

23.Sep.14 7 hours ago

sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 

Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick

These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 

I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.

This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 

These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 

(Source: discosbeforethebreakdown, via theroyaltenenblarghs)

23.Sep.14 9 hours ago

captainfantasticevans:

Chris Evans Beard Appreciation 64/100

(via provehitoinaltumechelon)

23.Sep.14 14 hours ago

harley-likethemotorcycle:

celestial-sexhair:

obytheby:

applecocaine:

myjamflavouredmindtardis:

megan15:

theybuildbuildings:

vintagegal:

Girls pose by a jail that recalls the witch trials of 1692 in Salem, Massachusetts. Photo taken in 1945.

I recently learned that the water in Salem was contaminated with the fungus from which LSD is derived and a legitimate theory for the whole thing is that everyone in the town was tripping balls 

This might be the greatest thing ive ever seen on the internet

We did a whole massive thing on this in history. I believe the fungus in question is called Ergot and it’s terrifying. It makes your muscles spasm so when they had seizures that was the reason, not because they were possessed. One woman had to be strapped to her bed, she was seizing so bad. And, like ‘theybuildbuildings’ said, it had the same effects as LSD; as soon as you touch it, let alone consume it, it messes with your entire system. The worst thing is, you practically always had a bad trip. Many complained about bugs crawling under their skin or monsters emerging from the shadows to scratch and bite at them until they were screaming. It was a horrendous thing and the worst part is, Ergot is still around. It grows on crops and, if your wheat isn’t properly treated, it can be eaten and you’ll most likely experience the same as the women of Salem. 

god i love history

This is hella cool and almost correct… 

The effects on the people of Salem were probably from consuming bread with the fungus in it, not from contaminated water. And apparently rye is way more commonly affected than wheat. In fact, often the members of the clergy were able to afford nicer bread made from wheat and thus were not as commonly affected.

You don’t go on a spasm-y trip just by touching it. You have to consume it for weeks, which results in chronic poisoning. ( If you stop eating it early enough, you may recover. So when people suffering from these “demonic possessions” took refuge in churches and stopped eating low-grade rye bread they were sometimes miraculously healed. 

More interesting facts:

Ergot poisoning can result in convulsions & hallucinations, or it can cause gangrene, depending on which group of active alkaloids are present. (Horrifying, either way.) It killed a lot of people in Europe in the Middle Ages. 

In Europe, often there was a strong correlation between wet summers (which provide ideal conditions for ergot) and reports of witchcraft/ possession. And in Norway and Scotland, records of witch persecution are only found in areas where rye was grown and used to make bread.

And I just learned right now that one author dude translated the word “Beowulf” as “barley-wolf” which could indicate a connection to ergot. The LSD-like effects could be a valid explanation for stories of Old Norse warriors going into the a sort of trancelike battle rage.

(this is exactly the kind of stuff my herbology medicinal plants class is about, it’s so cool omfg. we had a lecture on ergot last week.)

This is so cool

jess1s1n just interesting

Mexican hot chocolate appreciation.

(Source: chronic-mastication, via memexico)

23.Sep.14 16 hours ago

pussymakedarules:

this is actually really cute 

(Source: ryanhatesthis, via bobbie-rose)

thotstothinkabout:

thefitrasta:

Justin Lynch beating Michael Phelps record at just 16

SPREAD THIS LIKE FIRE

(via thewakeofdevastation)

22.Sep.14 19 hours ago

James Dean at the racetrack, photographed by Frank Worth, 1955.

(Source: thelittlefreakazoidthatcould, via jamesdeandaily)

22.Sep.14 19 hours ago